The UK’s job centres are undergoing a digital transformation as the government attempts to revamp them to meet the standards of today’s digital world.

The Department for Work and Pensions, which runs the job centres, estimates that installing the technology will save £2million per year.

Electronic pads that recognise job seekers’ signatures using biometric software will be installed at centres around the UK, along with PC workstations and free wi-fi.

The computers operate on the government’s network and share the same level of security against hacking and viruses.

The equipment has been tested at London Bridge Jobcentre.

“We’ve moved away from customers coming in and standing in a queue waiting to be directed,” said Baljeet Mahal, the branch’s customer services manager.

“We don’t have podiums, we don’t have public-access phones.

“If you look back to Job Centre Plus from years ago, we had boards with paper cards with vacancies on them – we don’t have those anymore.”

Business analyst John Oldroyd told the BBC that cyber-security was crucial for all new equipment.

“I think every organisation is a target for hackers,” he said.

“Security is a high priority for every system introduced.

“It’s all protected by the Department for Work and Pensions network, there are several firewalls in place.”